Dermatologist Charles E. Crutchfield III M.D. Announces Platelet Rich Plasma to Treat Hair Loss (Alopecia)

Charles Crutchfield III M.D., a nationally recognized Board Certified Dermatologist and Clinical Professor of Dermatology, offers Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy for hair loss and thinning hair.

Charles Crutchfield III M.D., a nationally recognized Board Certified Dermatologist and Clinical Professor of Dermatology, offers Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy for hair loss and thinning hair.

There is new evidence showing the effectiveness of PRP Therapy as a non-surgical medical procedure to treat hair loss and thinning hair. Charles E. Crutchfield III M.D. has seen significant results in patients seeking treatment for hair loss (Alopecia). “Using the patient’s own blood, we create a concentration of Platelet Rich Plasma to promote hair growth and rejuvenation.” Charles E. Crutchfield III M.D. explains the treatment and its benefits: “PRP therapy uses the patient’s blood to create the ideal formula of Platelet Rich Plasma. We start by drawing a blood sample and spinning the blood to separate its components: red blood cells, plasma, and platelet-rich plasma. Injecting the enriched platelet-rich plasma, (containing concentrated amounts of growth factors, cytokines, and platelets), into the treatment area. This PRP treatment stimulates the inactive hair follicles into an active growth phase.”

Dr. Crutchfield has years of experience treating hair loss (alopecia) with success. He is excited about new developments that have made platelet-rich plasma therapy a viable option in treating Alopecia. “When we inject PRP into the area of hair loss, it causes a mild irritation that triggers your body to heal, explains Dr. Crutchfield. “When the platelets are in the clot, enzymes are released that begin a tissue response to attract stem cells to heal and repair the damaged area. The results are an amplification of the body’s regularly occurring wound healing system.”

Dr. Crutchfield has seen a significant increase in the number of patients inquiring about this therapy. Estimates are that nearly 100 million Americans suffer from hair loss. PRP for Hair Loss Therapy is a breakthrough treatment option because it is a safe, reliable treatment that is short and non-surgical. The recovery period is fast, and the results look natural.

“In our experience, although PRP is not yet FDA approved for alopecia, we have a success rate of approximately 75%. I tell patients if they do not notice any regrowth after 2-3 treatments, not to continue. I define success as patients report that they see a significant amount of hair regrowth. I recommend a series of injections to be done monthly, for 4-6 months. Once patients achieve the level of hair regrowth that they are happy with, we will recommend a topical treatment program to maintain and extend the PRP treatment success and recommend a PRP treatment every 6 or 12 months for maintenance. “

The PRP treatment works well for both men and women. It is primarily designed to treat androgenetic alopecia, but we have had success in alopecia areata and hair loss associated with stress (telogen effluvium), too.

Dr. Crutchfield can review your specific case and help to develop a hair re-growth plan.

About Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD:
Charles E. Crutchfield III, M.D. is a graduate of the Mayo Clinic Medical School and a Clinical Professor of Dermatology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. Dr. Crutchfield is an annual selection in the “Top Doctors” issue of Mpls. St. Paul magazine. He is the only dermatologist to have been selected as a “Best Doctor for Women” by Minnesota Monthly magazine since the inception of the survey. Dr. Crutchfield has been selected as one of the “Best Doctors in America,” an honor awarded to only 4% of all practicing physicians. Dr. Crutchfield is the co-author of a children’s book on sun protection and dermatology textbook. He is a member of the AΩA National Medical Honor Society, an expert consultant for WebMD and CNN, and a recipient of the Karis Humanitarian Award from the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine. Dr. Crutchfield was also given “first a physician” award, Helathcare Hero, 100 most influential, and one of the Top 100 African –American Newsmakers in the United States by theGrio, an affiliate of NBC News. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grio_Awards

Crutchfield Dermatology is a proud member of Doctors for the Practice of Safe and Ethical Aesthetic Medicine (DPSEAM). http://www.SafeAndEthicalDoctors.org

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Man with groin rash that won’t go away. What is your diagnosis? Crutchfield Dermatology Case of the Month.

A 64 year old man presented with a diagnosis of tinea cruris. He said that he had been treating it for 3 years without resolution. He reported using at least 3 different prescription anti-fungal creams and for the past 5 months and used a different prescription cream called triamcinolone. He reports little to no pruritus. With the rash being so resistant, his primary care doctor referred him to a dermatologist for evaluation. Continue reading Man with groin rash that won’t go away. What is your diagnosis? Crutchfield Dermatology Case of the Month.

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An infant with papules and pustules on feet. What is your diagnosis? Dr. Crutchfield’s Case of the Month

Foot sores

11-month-old infant presents with pruritic crusted papules and pustules on feet, as seen in the picture. Also hand and axilla involvement. A teen cousin visiting for the summer has a similar rash, and both are very pruritic.

Here is a picture of a mineral oil scraping I took through the microscope ocular with my cell phone.

Microscopic photo

What is your diagnosis?

Continue reading An infant with papules and pustules on feet. What is your diagnosis? Dr. Crutchfield’s Case of the Month

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Olympics bring attention to cupping therapy

Cupping therapyDear Dr. Crutchfield: I was watching the Olympics and noticed several athletes had purple circular marks on their skin. Michael Phelps was one of the athletes. I was told the marks resulted from a treatment called “cupping.” What is cupping?

 

Although very popular now, cupping is actually an ancient medical treatment popular in Egyptian, Middle Eastern, and Chinese cultures. There are historical reports of cupping’s use as far back as 3,500 years ago. Continue reading Olympics bring attention to cupping therapy

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Hyperpigmentation

Hi, this is Dr. Charles Crutchfield clinical professor of dermatology and medical director at Crutchfield Dermatology.

One of the most challenging and common problems in skin of color are skin disorders that effect the intensity of skin color. Some diseases make skin lighter and other skin diseases make the skin darker.

For example babies when they have diaper rash this can cause the skin in the area to become a lot lighter. It’s very common for a child of color to have a very light area especially after a diaper rash. This is where the inflammation of the diaper irritation causes the melanocytes to stop producing color even light or white patches.

With the appropriate treatment the color will almost always return within a few weeks In older patients inflammation can cause darkening of the skin. This is known as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation.

This is commonly seen in areas where acne blemishes have healed, leaving a dark spot in that area. These, too, will fade with time. However, it can be quite persistent and sometimes doctors must use
medicines to make the dark areas fade faster.

Darkness after skin irritation is notoriously difficult to treat and can take time.

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Midline Hyperpigmentation & Macular Hypomelanosis

Hi this is Dr. Charles Crutchfield clinical professor of dermatology and medical director at Crutchfield Dermatology.

Today we are going to talk about two conditions– Midline Hyperpigmentation and also Macular Hypomelanosis. Two crazy long terms but you’ve seen them. They are real common. Often the central chest area can be slightly lighter in color than the other areas around it this is just a normal variation that we see in skin of color. Continue reading Midline Hyperpigmentation & Macular Hypomelanosis

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Recognizing and treating Molluscum Contagiosum

What is Molluscum Contagiosum? 

Molluscum Contagiosum is a viral infection that produces small, flesh-colored, dome shaped bumps that can often become irritated or painful. They may appear to have a shiny surface in a small central indentation, or white core.

Why should I care about Molluscum Contagiosum?

Molluscum Contagiosum is a benign condition that will spread through direct skin contact. This contact can be in the patient’s own skin spreading to other areas, or from direct skin-to-skin contact, especially in children. Molluscum Contagiosum can also be transmitted through swimming pools and shower room floors.

Most cases of Molluscum Contagiosum will go away without treatment. As the name implies, the condition is very contagious. Some of the lesions can become very painful and infected. When this happens, treatment is usually indicated.

man locker room

What causes Molluscum Contagiosum?

Molluscum Contagiosum is a viral infection caused by the poxvirus that infects only the skin and not any internal organs.

How common is Molluscum Contagiosum?

Molluscum Contagiosum is very common, especially in children whose immune systems have not developed immunity to the poxvirus that causes Molluscum Contagiosum. advice.42 web

 

How is Molluscum Contagiosum diagnosed?

The diagnosis of Molluscum Contagiosum is most commonly identified by a visual diagnosis; however, a biopsy of the skin and/or skin scrapings can also confirm the diagnosis.

flip flops

Can Molluscum Contagiosum be prevented?

Molluscum Contagiosum can be prevented by avoiding direct skin-to-skin contact with other persons who have Molluscum and wearing flip-flops to protect the skin from the floors of shower rooms. It is important for patients not to scratch Molluscum as it can spread to other areas of the body. This is especially important because shaving the legs is a common cause of spreading.

sandals

How is Molluscum Contagiosum treated?

Molluscum Contagiosum is often treated by “lack of treatment,” because many of the lesions will resolve on their own. As a dermatologist, I usually encounter the more difficult cases that do require treatment. I believe if you’re going to treat Molluscum, one should treat it early to prevent spreading it to others.

Because it is a viral infection, we must recruit the patient’s immune system to do a better job at recognizing the cells infected with the virus, and then eliminating the infected skin cells. This can be done by several methods including freezing, scraping, topical medications and laser therapy. All of these treatments can be performed in a dermatologist’s office.

If there are many lesions, several treatment sessions may be required for complete clearing. Some discomfort is also associated with Molluscum Contagiosum treatments. Sometimes an “at-home treatment” is also recommended; this can include applying topical medications. During treatment sessions, some new Molluscum may develop, and this is normal.

Action steps for anyone with unwanted Molluscum Contagiosum

Lesions should be covered to avoid direct skin contact with other schoolchildren, or other people, to prevent spreading of Molluscum. If a patient has Molluscum Contagiosum, the condition should be evaluated by a primary care physician or dermatologist to see if treatment is required.

Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD is a board certified dermatologist and Clinical Professor of Dermatology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. He also has a private practice in Eagan, MN. He has been selected as one of the top 10 dermatologists in the United States by Black Enterprise magazine and one of the top 21 African-American physicians in the U.S. by the Atlanta Post. Dr. Crutchfield is an active member of the Minnesota Association of Black Physicians, MABP.org.

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Why should I care about DPNs (face flesh moles)?

Dermatosis papulosa nigra (DPN) is a unique skin condition seen primarily in persons of color. It appears as small, dark bumps and most commonly affects the forehead, cheeks, and neck. The bumps increase in size and number over time, initially appearing in people ages 20-30. Some people call them “flesh moles.” Bill Cosby, Morgan Freeman and Condoleezza Rice are notable people with the condition. It tends to occur slightly more frequently in women than in men.

What causes DPN?

The cause of dermatosis papulosa nigra is uncertain. There is a strong genetic basis for the disorder, and oftentimes the lesions can be seen in several members of the same family. Under the microscope, the lesions are a type of keratosis that is harmless. Dermatosis papulosa nigra is not a skin cancer, and it will not turn into a skin cancer.

 

How is DPN diagnosed?

The diagnosis is easily made by a dermatologist.

Face moles before treatment
Facial moles before treatment & removal

 

 

face mole removal
Face after mole treatment and removal

Can DPN be prevented?

No, because it is passed on genetically. One can treat the bumps when they are small to prevent them from becoming obvious and maintain a regular treatment program (every 1-4 years) to keep them away.

 

How is DPN treated?

Generally speaking, no treatment is necessary other than for cosmetic concerns. In certain circumstances, if the lesions are symptomatic (painful, inflamed or itchy) or cosmetically undesirable, the lesions can be treated via a minor in-office surgical procedure with excellent results. Your doctor will review treatment options with you and recommend the one that is most appropriate for your condition.

 

Action steps

Realize the condition is inherited and occurs later in life but does not turn into skin cancer. The spots may get worse over time, and they can be removed if they are irritated or unwanted. If DPN is undesirable, there are techniques used by an experienced dermatologist to provide excellent treatment results.

 

Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD is a board-certified dermatologist and Clinical Professor of Dermatology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. He also has a private practice in Eagan, MN. He has been selected as one of the top 10 dermatologists in the United States by Black Enterprise magazine and one of the top 21 African American physicians in the U.S. by the Atlanta Post. Dr. Crutchfield is an active member of the Minnesota Association of Black Physicians, MABP.org.

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