What you should know about acne – Part #1

The medical term for acne is “acne vulgaris.” Acne is the most common skin disorder in the United States and the number-one reason patients visit a dermatologist.

Approximately 50 million Americans suffer from acne. Over 80 percent of all teenagers battle acne. Continue reading What you should know about acne – Part #1

Acne affects all ages and can be treated

Acne before and after treatment
Acne before (l) and after (r) treatment

MSR: Are teens the only ones who deal with acne?

CC: Absolutely not. I see patients in their teens, 20s, 30s, even 40s and 50s who have to deal with acne. The majority of acne occurs in the teenage years, and that’s why it’s thought of as a teen disease; however, patients of all ages can deal with acne. Continue reading Acne affects all ages and can be treated

Acne Treamtents for Skin of Color

Hi, this is Dr. Charles Crutchfield clinical professor of dermatology and medical director at Crutchfield Dermatology.

Today we are going to talk about acne.

Now when treating acne in persons of color, the brown spots after
the acne blemishes have healed, this is also known as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation, can be a real problem. Continue reading Acne Treamtents for Skin of Color

5 Acne Skin Care Care Tips

  1. To prevent acne scars, do not pop, squeeze or pick at acne.
  2. Seek treatment early for acne that does not respond to over-the-counter medications.
  3. Gently wash affected areas twice a day. Vigorous washing and scrubbing can irritate your skin and make acne worse.
  4. Shampoo hair often, daily if it is oily.
  5. Use oil-free cosmetics and sunscreens. Avoid astringents, which strip your skin of natural moisture.